Scientific methods

Think learning and alcohol don’t go together? Wrong. The two can co-exist, as long as the drinking is in moderation
Think learning and alcohol don’t go together? Wrong. The two can co-exist, as long as the drinking is in moderation
Jan 15
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Think learning and alcohol don’t go together? Wrong. The two can co-exist, as long as the drinking is in moderation.

Look at The Afterthought’s long-running, monthly Science Cafe. Or the numerous trivia nights around the area. And then there’s Museum of Discovery’s Science After Dark. So learning and alcohol (moderation, again, must be stressed) can hang out in the same room.

With that in mind, let’s introduce Skeptics in the Pub, a night that Skeptics founder Kyle Sanders (an Air Force pilot with a degree in space systems engineering and a passion for science) describes as people getting together “over a pint to talk about science and critical thinking as it pertains to popular culture.”

Skeptics in the Pub makes its public debut tonight at The Joint in North Little Rock. The event is 6-7:30 p.m. with The Joint’s improv group The Joint Venture taking the stage at 8 p.m. Skeptics in the Pub is free. Cover for The Joint Venture is $5. The learning-meets-drinking fun will be hosted by Sanders and Sake Society of Arkansas founder Ben Bell.

“Our topics are the many, many questionable claims we come across every day and probably have been fooled by ourselves: pseudoscience, alternative medicine, frauds, hoaxes, quacks and dubious marketing claims,” Sanders says. “These lighthearted subjects can have serious implications.”

Besides the public discussion, Skeptics in the Pub will include more audience participation with trivia, small group discussions, Q&A sessions with experts and audience games. If all goes well — well being that people learn and enjoy themselves over some pints (or coffee or soft drinks) — the plan is for Skeptics in the Pub to become a twice-monthly event.

“I started Skeptics for the kind of exciting conversation that can only be had with other geeks,” Sanders says. “Science events in Little Rock are popular but far between, and there was plenty of room for a science event that doesn’t take itself too seriously.”

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